Publication

There are more than 70,000 Oklahomans who suffer from Alzheimer's disease (AD) and it is estimated that 96,000 patients will be diagnosed with AD by 2025 in Oklahoma. Cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease is thought to be the result of disturbed neuronal communication due to synaptic dysfunction. Aggregated amyloid beta protein accumulates in AD, a process dependent on synaptic activity. In this series of studies we investigate how synaptobrevin1, an essential synaptic protein, regulates amyloid secretion. Maintaining physiological synaptic function while reducing amyloid secretion may provide a breakthrough to design effective therapies that halt progression of dementia in Alzheimer's disease.

Publication

Most of the research activities in epilepsy studies focus on 'channelopathies', which may lead to increased excitability of neurons. The studies in this research area examine the role of a different disease mechanism for epilepsy.

Publication

Previous studies have provided compelling evidence that the Growth Hormone (GH)–IGF-1 axis is a conserved pathway important for determination of both healthspan and lifespan in diverse organisms. Nevertheless, controversies related to the effects of these hormones remain and will continue until appropriate and translationally relevant animal models that can be developed and used to regulate GH and IGF-1 levels throughout the lifespan. We and our colleagues in several scientific consensus reports have recognized the necessity of new animal models for advancement of the field. The ongoing studies in our laboratory use novel animal models and interventions that are designed to produce one of the most comprehensive and rigorous analyses of the effects of age-related changes in IGF-1 on pathology and lifespan using a pre-clinical, translationally relevant approach.

Publication

There is growing evidence suggesting that the evolutionarily conserved insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling pathway regulates both life span and development of age-related diseases, including cancer.

Publication

Diabetic retinopathy remains the leading cause of blindness in working age adults. Currently, there are no approved and demonstrated treatments for diabetic retinopathy aside from insulin replacement therapy and blood pressure control. Recent longitudinal study reports have demonstrated that despite achieving stable blood glucose levels and HbA1c control, patients formerly under non-intensive insulin therapy continue to have a higher rate of diabetic retinopathy and other complications.

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